Category Archives: Story Behind The Song

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Story Behind The Song – In Time by Lake Jons

Like almost all the songs we’ve done, I started recoding some ideas with the guitar in the Lake Jons Garage. The song “In Time” came quite quickly together but the lyrics waited for almost one year to be finished.

 *photo credits to Arttu Kokkonen


It was the song that was born just after we had mastered our two EP’s so it was in some kind of an empty space between the old and new. We had no hurry to finish it and it stayed in the demo folder for a year or so. When we started planning on releasing the second EP and we got an idea to put “In Time” on it even though it was still on the demo stage.

We put it together and finished the lyrics. I listened to my old demo guitars and wondered even though they were recorded kind of carelessly I loved them cause of the sound and the feel. The only thing that we kept having a problem with was the beat. To have it or not to have it. Just couple of days before mastering the song we ended up finding the right minimal beat for the song. But in the end we kept basically every track from the demo session and replaced only a few instruments like for example the vocals.

 

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The key message of the song “I take my chances” is pretty straight forward so I don’t think it needs more unwrapping.

The way the song came together was pretty unusual for us. It was a slow process of one year.

 

-Jooel Jons, Lake Jons

www.facebook.com/lakejonsmusic

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SBTS – Cash 4 Gold by Rachel Mallin & The Wild Type

I wrote Cash 4 Gold in 15 minutes. I have to start at the beginning to give you context for the song’s inspiration:

 

“For aesthetically disenfranchised furnishings, we are like the families that adopt troubled children and refugees from around the world – we see beauty within and cannot say no.” - A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius (Dave Eggers)
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For the majority of my life, my mom has owned a larger-than-average, depreciating house at the bottom of a cul-de-sac on Easy Street in Gladstone, MO. I’m not saying Easy Street to be ironic, it’s literally called Easy St.

 

Over the years, the house has collected antiques and miscellaneous items of sentimental value that grow in number corresponding to the inconceivable amount of life my mom, two brothers, and myself have experienced there. After you live anywhere long enough, you begin to realize how much the place you call home reflects the characteristics of the people who inhabit it. It’s not pretty, nor is it like any other house I’ve visited, but it looks like it was lived in, and it’s seen every inch that we have. Divorce, birthday parties, mom’s home-cooked holiday dinners, loud arguments, loud music, brother’s leaving for college, me leaving for college, relatives we take care of, relatives we plan funerals for. If the memories aren’t tangible enough to leave a presence in the house, I’m sure we could dig through the stacks of bullshit to prove they happened.

 

 

I think most people of my generation, including myself at times, have a disposable mentality about the world. How things are made today for the sake of mass-quantity rather than quality leaves us with little objection against tossing something when it no longer fulfills its purpose for us anymore. My mom was raised on a farm by parents who lived through The Depression Era, so our ideas of preservation are a little bit different. The house is essentially furnished with family heirlooms manufactured in the eras spanning between Civil War – present day, and I’m sure they would be worth a pretty substantial amount on craigslist… yet she struggles to dismiss what that particular object means or has meant to her.

 

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It took all of about fifteen minutes to write Cash4Gold, because I’ve seen the medical bills, bank statements, and documents of life expenses that collect on top of the boxes – we live in a big house, but we’ve never been wealthy.

 

I know what it’s like to watch someone you love caught in circumstances which force them to assign a monetary value to an object that bares a priceless personal and historical value.

 

A value of memories that reflect the way this object has fulfilled its intended purpose for the children you’ve raised and the human beings you’ve loved and cared for in years passed. Objects that have endured and existed through the years, like we have and we continue to. No matter what these items that cover the tables and line the walls are sold for to someone else; that person will never know how much it meant to us.

-Rachel Mallin, lead vocals

www.facebook.com/RachMalisSass

 

Cash 4 Gold Lyrics:

 

We just toss our troubles on the shelves with all the rest of our bullshit
I just hope for peace when I come home
You won’t know me like you thought you did

 

Boxes of posterity
Stacked up to our ears
I don’t care for what it’s worth in ten or twenty years
Cause money comes and money goes
And everybody claims to know
Let’s trade our baby, get rich fast
Spin our gold back into cash
Just so long as it lasts

 

We love our house, we settle down
We fantasize it burning down
We’re placing bets
On who comes to take it first
Mother nature, or the men from the IRS
Cause it’s all trash

 

Boxes of posterity
Stacked up to our ears
It’s not worth the trouble in ten or twenty years
Cause money comes and money goes
And everybody claims to know
Let’s sell our child, get rich fast
Spin our gold back into cash
Just so long as it lastsJust so long as it lasts
Darlin’ nothing ever lasts

 

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Story Behind The Song – Love U More by DANI

Love U More was written at my first writing session with my now best friend Omar Khan. We literally had the song finished within an hour.

 

Usually when you write a song one of two things will happen; you will either sit there for hours banging your head against the wall trying to come up with ideas, or things flow naturally. Gratefully, on this particular day, it was one of those easy sessions that just flowed naturally.  I realize there is this deep dark place inside me when i’m writing songs.

 

I always feel like I’m doing well in life or like I’m okay, but as soon as these songs come out, they are so emotional and full of pain; I start to question my mental state. LOL.  It’s like I’ve got this sadness about me I can’t really describe.

 

I’ve had people ask me to write more “upbeat” and “happy” songs but the more I come into my own and figure out who I am as an artist, I more I realize the “happy go lucky” songwriter is just not me.

 

My songs are emotional and have a sense of loneliness in them because i suppose I like singing about the pain. When I listen to other artists I’m also drawn to low tempo emotional music.

 

 

Some of my favourite artists are BANKS, Spooky Black and James Blake.  I love artists who draw from experience and I love it to reflect the music.

 

DANI

www.danimusicofficial.com
www.facebook.com/danimusicofficial
www.soundcloud.com/danimusicofficial

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Story Behind The Song – Boy by Bleachbear

 

The song Boy actually began as a soft, acoustic song. I was messing around transitioning between two chords and vocally riffing over them when I came up with the melody. I played the song for my bandmates and they suggested we replace the acoustic guitar with the overdriven bass line that you now hear on the track.

 

 

Lyrically, Boy is the simplest song I have ever written.  I transitioned to songwriting from writing poetry and thus I love intricate lyrics. However, I wanted to try something new with Boy by using aloof lyrics and letting the instrumentation convey the story. The emotion I wanted to capture was desperation. The track starts off sparse with just the bass and slowly builds as the other instruments are added in, climaxing with the guitar solo before simmering back down.

The chorus lyric “Can you feel the wind” was a line I cut out from a poem.

In fact, all the songs from the album Cowboy Movie Star are snippets from poems. 

It was part of a project I did last summer where I created a collages from vintage postcards intermixed with phrases from cut-apart poems, in what amounted to an ode to western deserts, 1950´s slow dances, and old Hollywood.  One of the postcards portrayed a lone cowboy and it conjured in my mind this heartbreaker cowboy protagonist who never stays long in one place, hence the verse lyric “that boy he goes like a bird like a ship like a plane.”

 

“I wrote the song from the prospective of one of his mistresses begging him to stay, her building desperation mirroring the crescendo of the song’s instrumentation as she implores if he can feel anything at all anymore.”

 

Our debut album Lost Parade was extremely personal, and this upcoming album is no less personal. However, this time around I projected the emotions I was feeling at the time through these cinematic lenses which I think added some depth to the lyrics.  I’ll admit I’m a sucker for love songs, but with this album I wanted the listener to have to work harder to discover meaning behind the lyrics rather than being able to label the tracks as “just another love song” or such.

Although I’ve already solved the puzzle for this track, there’s nine more you can dissect when the album comes out July 30th!

Tigerlily Cooley,

main vocals/songwriter/guitarist

www.bleachbear.com

Bleachbearband@gmail.com

www.instagram.com/bleachbearband

www.facebook.com/bleach.bear.10

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SBTS – Don’t Be Strange by Doppler

A random turn of events on Soundcloud led me to discover and befriend Jamie Mulrooney of Doppler, a small outfit from Ireland looking to spread its wings out to the wider music industry. I spoke to Jamie on one of their songs, “Don’t Be Strange”

-Calvyn

When I’m low I find it very easy to reflect. I draw solace from the process of writing lyrics or simple melodies and piecing them together. Its like therapy. In reality I was pretty depressed at the time of writing this song and it is only now when I look back at these lyrics it seems strange to think that I felt so low. Its a track that I don’t like listening to as it bring up memories that I have no interest in revisiting.

“Don’t Be Strange” is a by product of my state of mind around that time. I ended up writing several songs on the same subject but this seems to be the most poignant. Suitably, it was written in the depth of an Irish winter which itself can be pretty depressing. The sky is always grey and there are 16 hours of total darkness and the light which shines in between is weak and has to battle through dense cloud and rain. As you can imagine most of the time is spent indoors and as I spent two thirds of my time alone because of work, it was only a matter of time before I reflected on personal experiences that had not gone the way in which i envisaged that year.

I had come out of a serious relationship and cursed the time that I felt I wasted. I was bitter and self loathing. It very hard to convey how I felt but it wasn’t good. Several of my best friends had all emigrated to Australia for years and I was one of the only ones that remained in Ireland. I felt like I missed the opportunity of a lifetime and it was now too late to join the party.

On the mornings during this time I often spent hours reflecting. I’d be looking back romantically at the past when in reality I knew that this exercise would be fruitless. That I was looking back into the past with rose tinted glasses and confusing the past with fantasy. I found it hard to let go.

 

Jamie Mulrooney

As usual I just wrote about what was in my mind. I wrote the lyrics over the course of 2-3 hours on a dreary morning in my kitchen. The chords changes were simple just going back and forth like a wave between a variation on A major and E Major. I then added the sound of the Ocean crashing in the background and put it very low in the mix but I think it fitted metaphorically with what the content as well as it being therapeutic, which fitted neatly into ideology that the process of making music was a release to me. I recorded it with my makeshift studio on the kitchen table and had the lions share recorded before midday.

The lyrical content was honest and I didn’t question the words as much as I usually do. I later found that lots of better writers do some of their best work first thing in the morning as they’re less self conscious about what they are saying and they haven’t had enough time to question and belittle their own subconscious.

“You need time to make you feel better,
You need sound to clear your mind,
Sat alone with your regret thinking about how you can change.
For your memories deceive you, nostalgia makes you strange.”

“You need life, surrounding us to keep you warm.
You need women to heal the cracks that you have torn
And I know you’re healing, you’re getting better everyday.
I just hope that you cope with nostalgia when you’re grieving,
Don’t Let it Make you strange.”

The chorus was slightly more uplifting. I was listening to a lot of Bill Withers at the time and Lean On Me was uplifting and honest voice to draw upon as well as Use Me and Ain’t No Sunshine. Receiving and sharing help was something that I was lucky enough to understand and I knew that in future times I would hope to be the voice of reason or be somebody to confide in. But for now I had to realise that I was the one who needed help.

“I’m only around the corner.
I’m only around the corner when you need a friend.
I’m not going to change,
I still think about you now and then.”

The outro was a darker image that passed through my mind at my cousins funeral earlier that year. He had suffered with a long illness and I thought about his wife and children and what they were going through. I was listening to On Raglan Road a poem written by Patrick Kavanagh and performed by Luke Kelly which covers the same topics. Trying to accept loss is difficult and its just something I wanted to convey with the imagery.

“When you died in the Spring, I could have died with you too.
Throwing soil over your body, can I go down with you.
If I could be buried tomorrow would it be next to you?
I don’t want the truth.”

Many people say that they don’t care if people like their songs and its “All about the music”. I never bought into that idea at all and in fact I think that the people who say that are just lying. Getting vindication or being complimented for your music is amazing and the fact that people are listening to this song and drawing their own conclusions from it makes me feel great. It gave me a sense of purpose. And it couldn’t have came at a better time.

-Jamie Mulrooney, Doppler

facebook.com/dopplerireland

soundcloud.com/dopplerireland

jamiemulrooneydoppler.bandcamp.com/

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SBTS – This Time by Thought Beneath Film

“This Time” by Thought Beneath Film is the final track of their debut album Cartographers. Today, vocalist Brent Wirth walks us through his creative process.

-Mark

 

The process of writing a song (or an album for that matter) is often non-linear. Fragments of melodies, lyrics and ideas can often drift around one’s consciousness for weeks, months, even years in some cases before a purpose or place is found for them. Some may even be forever condemned to musical purgatory, never finding that purpose or place within the context of a song.

 

Ultimately, “This Time” is a culmination of remote fragments and ideas that had been drifting around in my mind merging together and finally finding their place to form a complete thought.

 

“This Time” began with the simple pentatonic melody that is featured throughout the verse sections of the song. I can’t recall the specific place or time that I stumbled upon it, but most of my creativity seems to strike in the small hours of the night when all of the filters in my brain finally shut down. Knowing this trend, I often force myself to stay awake far beyond the point that my body wants to just in case a great melody or idea presents itself.

 

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Unfortunately, they don’t always come and it’s easy to become discouraged. Given this simple fact, having patience and faith in the notion that another great idea will eventually strike is vital to being successful as a songwriter.

 

I recently read The Pinkerton Diaries by Weezer’s frontman Rivers Cuomo and I think he really epitomized the process with an analogy he made in one of the essays featured in this book. He eloquently compares being a songwriter to being a hunter:

 

A more successful approach is stealth. Farmer’s cats are known to shut their eyes, believing that as they can’t see, neither can they be seen, stalking the cow’s milk pail. Every day I try this. I casually enter the garage, stroll as if without purpose in the direction of my guitar, and at the last moment, pounce, and strum furiously, and sing and hope I’ve caught a tune unawares. Most often they’ve seen me coming, and fly off laughing. But not always, and this is the reason I keep trying. (The Pinkerton Diaries, p. 106)

 

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Although I felt very strongly about the melody, I didn’t really have a clear sense of which direction to take it in. So, the melody remained dormant in my mind for months. The funny thing about songwriting is that it’s not always a melodic idea, rhythmic structure or harmonic progression that illuminates a path for a potential song. Sometimes, it can be vague, abstract and disparate ideas randomly merging together in your mind. This notion was definitely true in the case of “This Time”.

 

I remember experimenting with an EBow (a hand-held electronic device for playing electric guitar in which the strings are moved by the electromagnetic field created by the device, producing a sound that is reminiscent of bowed orchestral strings) one day and having what I thought was an ingenious idea at the time: composing a piece for an EBowed guitar quartet – kind of like a futuristic version of a traditional string quartet. I quickly banged out and recorded a few measures of a four-part arrangement in G flat major (one of my go to keys for one reason or another) for EBowed guitars.

 

The sound was interesting, but not interesting enough to appease my appetite for sonic novelty at the time.

 

The lingering hunger pains inevitably led to the crazy notion to digitally reverse everything I had just recorded to completely change the attack and dynamic envelopes of the sound. Finally! The sound that I was looking for! The only issue was that, by reversing everything, the melody and harmonic progression were backwards and no longer sounded coherent (this very recording was actually added to the end of “This Time” and serves as the song’s outro). This forced me to re-recording everything backwards (a tedious process) with the intention of it being reversed for the sonic effect.

 

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After listening back several times, I quickly noticed the similarities between the melodies in the recording I just produced and the pentatonic melody that had been floating around in my brain for sometime. I hastily worked out a fingerstyle guitar arrangement to house the pentatonic melody that had been haunting me for all of those weeks and crudely dovetailed it to the reversed EBow music.

 

With minimal meddling, the parts worked together quite well. From that point, the ideas started to flow and the remaining sections of the song came together quite quickly. It was as if a bridge finally formed between a divide. I was finally able to reach the other side and complete the song.

 

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Despite being one of the band’s oldest songs, “This Time” was never featured on our early demo and EP releases. Much like the writing process behind it, it was a difficult song to record. Every section of the song is so sonically diverse that it was difficult to give any recording of the song a sense of cohesion. However, upon our most recent attempt, I think we managed to finally capture our vision of the song on record. All of our patience and faith finally paid off and “This Time” finally found its place by becoming the closing song on our debut full-length album, “Cartographers”. In my opinion, it’s the most sonically adventurous and structurally unique song on the record.

It’s very unconventional and, ultimately, I think that’s a testament to the unconventional way the song came together.

-Brent Wirth, Thought Beneath Film

http://www.thoughtbeneathfilm.ca

https://www.facebook.com/thoughtbeneathfilm

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Story Behind The Song – Up & In by Katie Bulley

 

My song “Up & In” was written last summer shortly after I purchased my postwar 1949 Gibson ES-150. That might have had something to do with the rockabilly influence in the song.

 

The first day I brought that guitar home, all I wanted to play was oldies music. Must have been some of that spirit still kickin’ around in the ol’ hollow body. After a few days of playing those rhythms and patterns I developed one that was unique to me and started singing along. In this particular case the melody came along with some lyrics and once that happens, there is a sense of accomplishment. Keep in mind, that is only the beginning.

 

Once the spark of the song caught on, I needed to search for lumber to throw on that fire! I already had the phrase “Up & In” as the “tipi” base so, that was good. I wanted to move the idea of the traditional lyric “Down & Out” forward into a positive phrase that would give the listener as well as myself hope that there is a solution for catching the blues! Searching for my “lumber” was me digging through my memory of those hard times past. That’s where the ideas for the verses came in.

 

Katie Bulley

 

The resolving of the song where I sing “Now I’m Up and In” is where it all comes together (we get to roast marsh mellows if we’re still using the campfire analogy). The song was complete and not only does it move that idea forward, it also pays tribute to it idea by sharing some of my personal low times. We all go through rough patches but we all get to reach those “Up & In” moments to if we embrace our inner strength to get there. I like my marsh mellows roasted golden on a twig, what about you?

 

I hope you all enjoyed my essay. Follow me @katiebulley to stay in the loop about my new album ‘Sun Wolf’ coming this spring! Recorded at the legendary Sun Studio in Memphis, TN!

 

Sincerely,

K.Bulley (www.katiebulley.com)

ps. Two of my favourite songs about being ‘Down & Out’ are;
Bessie Smith- Nobody Knows you when you’re Down and Out
Sonny Boy Williamson- Down and Out Blues
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SBTS – Children by The Henry Millers

Children by New York duo The Henry Millers is the first single for their upcoming  album Posies. 

Bandleader and songwriter John MacCallum writes on IndieVerse, explaining the inspiration and history behind this song.

 

-Mark-

 

As I was getting ready to write this I found myself reading a few other of the musician written articles on IndieVerse. I came across one such article by Kaela Sinclair and I wanted to say first and foremost how struck I was by the essay in general, but more specifically how much I related to one point in particular that she made:

“The need to create permanent and complex art can be satiated with much more ease without the stresses of a budget and timeline.”

I have found that my own desire to make music stems from a need to solve or even simply cope with a problem. Even if it is a story told in the 3rd person, the music we make always has a piece of us inside of it. It has in a way always been a source of therapy and because of that I have always wanted to make music that I personally want to listen to; music that I will enjoy and more importantly music that will help me get through the day. I don’t know what I would do if the only way I could create recorded music was based around somebody else’s ‘budget and timeline.’

It’s unfathomable. Its… without fathom.

 

Our songs always begin with a home recording. “Children” actually began as a song called “Taxi Ride” and was one of the first songs I had recorded. I was going to school in Charleston, SC and at one point when I was back in New York, visiting home, I had an encounter with a seemingly wise old man who was driving me in his taxi. He enlightened me to the hardships of being the caretaker for a family and how difficult the task of raising children can be, especially in a big city. This rather innocuous interaction really stuck with me and eventually led me to write and record a song called Taxi Ride.

As we were finishing up Daisies and I was beginning to write and record songs that would eventually become Posies, I spent time listening to old demos to see if there could be anything to use for new music. The only song that moved me in any significant way was Taxi Ride. I felt a connection to the words and the music that was just as strong as when it had been originally recorded years earlier.

I proceeded to make a new demo at home using the techniques I have learned over the years and that in conjunction with working with Max Drummey and Dan Stringer as producers is what eventually created the version of “Children” you hear now.

-John MacCallum, The Henry Millers

 

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SBTS – Fall Of The Summer Heart by The Foreign Films

To be honest, I wasn’t too sure what to expect from Fall Of The Summer Heart. The first thing that caught my attention was the length of the track – almost 13 minutes!

I had assumed that the time would be somehow occupied by a chorus or bridge on repeat, steadily wearing itself away. What I encountered however, was something else entirely.

A musical masterpiece, with an eight part song cycle. A full year’s worth of songwriting and inspiration was packed into this. I have never heard this much diversity in a single song since the legendary Bohemian Rhapsody (not a comparison I use lightly).

Here are the titles of all eight parts:

I/Maze of Your Heart
II/Silver Tears of Rain (My darling dear)
III/Star Gazing
IV/Fall of The Summer Heart
V/She Disappeared
VI/Victoria (Miss India)
VII/Lost At Sea
VIII/A Ghost of Myself

With us today is Bill Majoros, the man behind The Foreign Films 

-Mark

 

One morning after playing a show in England I awoke from a rather hazy, soft focus dream.

 

An imaginary record seemed to haunt my sleep! I sang and mumbled all but forgotten fragments of melody into my “tape recorder”. Random foggy images of came to mind as well. Blackbirds, ghosts, a maze, heart broken lovers, a fortune teller, an abandoned amusement park at Crystal Beach, being in my Dads old car listening to a neon jukebox style radio as summer fades to autumn.

Again bits of sonic colour, melody and rhythm.

 

Days later I listened to the total nonsense I’d recorded! Like an archaeologist of the subconscious I began to piece these ideas together note by note. Connecting the dots from the past to the present. The result is the 13 minute single “Fall of the Summer Heart”. I’ve always loved  song forms that shatter the mirror of traditional structure. My dream did this for me! I guess you could call it a song cycle, or a dream sequence.

Songs within a song.

 

 

As far as recording goes I’m very lucky to have a supremely talented group of musicians/friends around me. I think of music in very cinematic terms,telling stories with sounds and musical colour. Because I’m a multi-instrumentalist I’ll lay down the basic drums,guitars,keys and lead vocals. Bass and recording wizard Carl Jennings plays a giant role throughout the journey. Kori Pop,a wildly creative musician, brings the track alive with her magic vocals!

 

When Bill calls me in to contribute vocals to Foreign Films material, I am always game. Because he has such a creative and solid sense of harmonic structure, it ends up being a singers playground! First, I listen for any instrumental hooks that vocals may be able to pull out even more. Secondly, I see if there are any obvious harmonies to add to his main vocal part. After these bases are covered…it’s time for the real fun!! When working on Fall of the Summer Heart, I tried to imagine my vocal parts as characters in scenes from a movie. Carl Jennings is a serious mastermind when it comes to producing vocals – he inspired vocal parts that I never would have imagined – like the weirdly charming  ”tralala’s” in Part V/She Disappeared and the tribal “ooh la la’s” in Part VI/Victoria (Miss India).

- Kori Pop

Kirk Starkey adds brush strokes of technicolor strings to heighten the emotional themes of the lyrics. Tim Allard and Marie Avery add additional keyboard and organ textures and sonics.

 

 

Records are, funny enough, records. They’re a snapshot, a time and place. Musicians, technology and emotion-interwoven, entwined, tangled together..forever. If you listen deep they may just let you step into another world, an alternate universe of sound where you to can almost time travel. They weave a web from yesterday to tomorrow. Records can allow you to freeze in time a lost love or a distant summer. If you’re a song writer you can live in the moment and create a soundtrack to your own life in real time.

 

The Foreign Films new LP “The Record Collector”  is the story of a girl who  obsessively collects music. Her dreams, fears, journals, calendars, friends and lovers all corresponding with a tapestry of 45′s and LP’s. The seasons cycle round as her records spiral round. The album blurs fact and fiction, the real and surreal, the conscious and subconscious.

 

Look for the new LP

April 2014

The Foreign Films-

The Record Collector

theforeignfims.com

 

- Bill Majoros

 

 

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Story Behind The Song – Meet Me by Animal Years

Meet Me –  The first single from Sun Will Rise, the latest album from Brooklyn based Animal Years

 

Mike McFadden, the driving force behind Animal Years tells us more about his song.

-Mark-

“Meet Me” was an easy song to write. Easy in the sense that I had the idea for the song and plenty of lyrical content to work with. Emotionally it was one of the most difficult songs to write because of the circumstances that were going on while I was writing it.

I was living in Baltimore last year when a song that I had written was selected to be in a huge ad campaign for Pennzoil. With the money I made I quit my comfy job at Johns Hopkins University and decided I was finally going to move to New York and be a musician full-time.

“Meet Me” is about relationships and leaving people behind for new adventures. Not only did I leave my job (which I loved) , I also left my family, friends, and a girl that I finally thought I could have a meaningful relationship with.

 

The lyrics are loosely based on my trying to convince someone to stay with me even though we would be apart most of the time, but also talking about the uncertainty of  picking up and moving to a new place with much uncertainty about the future.

Now that I’ve lived in New York for over a year, “Meet Me” takes on a much different tone for me when we play it live. I think more about the things that I’ve overcome, and am happy that I’m able to look back on what I’ve left with appreciation rather than regret. This excerpt is a great example of this, talking about how then I was upset with the situation but now have come to terms:

“I had half a mind to come back, you had a reason to let me in, but I had so much more to tell you way back then”

 

-Mike McFadden

 

http://www.animalyearsmusic.com/

https://www.facebook.com/AnimalYears